Wanted: Butterflies in Hamburg – Who is joining the search?

With the app “ObsIdentify,” everyone can participate in the challenge. © LIB

 

To find rare species, we do not need to travel far. There are many places in Hamburg where we can find rare or even endangered animals. Even in densely populated areas like Hamburg, there is a lack of constant biomonitoring to know exactly which species are present. Help our butterfly expert Karina Brandão shed some light on this blind spot: From June 1st to September 30th 2024, we are searching for six species together using the „ObsIdentify“ app on your mobile phone.

Biomonitoring is an action conducted by biologists to count species over a certain period. These numbers determine the frequency of species in an area and whether a species is endangered if it is really rare. Since these investigations are time-consuming and costly, even our researchers sometimes need help – this time from all Hamburg residents, regardless of age, equipped with a smartphone or a parent who can contribute one.

From July 1st to September 30th, 2024, anyone with a smartphone can join the search in the Hanseatic city and use the „ObsIdentify“ app to capture images of six species. We only want to photograph the animals and document their presence, not disturb or harm them. All collected data will help better assess the presence of the six butterflies in Hamburg. Our photo gallery shows which species to look for. There are also maps showing where these beautiful insects have been found so far. The data will be compiled and used by Karina Brandão for further studies, who is also confirming the species identification.

Simply download the app here and collect data to support the research. If you manage to take a particularly great snapshot, we would be happy if you share the find directly on Instagram or Facebook with us. Use the hashtag #WantedButterflies and tag us in the post with @museumdernatur.hamburg. Especially active observers will also have the chance to win an exclusive tour of the butterfly collection at the Museum of Nature Hamburg – it’s worth participating multiple times.

Join the search and help us document these beautiful butterflies in Hamburg!

 

How to Participate:

  • Download the “ObsIdentify” app from the Apple App Store or Google Play.
  • Create an account.
  • Under Challenges, find “Gesucht: Schmetterlinge in Hamburg – Wer macht mit?” and follow the instructions.
  • Photograph the six butterfly species in Hamburg and let the app identify them.
  • The app will automatically assign your find to the challenge.
Apatura iris: This butterfly is mainly found in forests and lives up to an altitude of 1,200 meters. Even though Hamburg does not have such heights, it can be found near the goat willow (Salix caprea), which is also found in the city.
Apatura iris: This butterfly is mainly found in forests and lives up to an altitude of 1,200 meters. Even though Hamburg does not have such heights, it can be found near the goat willow (Salix caprea), which is also found in the city.
Argynnis paphia: Found in clearings in open woodlands, especially with alders or beeches. It also occurs up to altitudes of 1,200 meters. Look out for clearings with violets, meadowsweet, or thistles. They love the nectar of thistle heads, blackberry flowers, scabious, or the double umbels of angelica.
Argynnis paphia: Found in clearings in open woodlands, especially with alders or beeches. It also occurs up to altitudes of 1,200 meters. Look out for clearings with violets, meadowsweet, or thistles. They love the nectar of thistle heads, blackberry flowers, scabious, or the double umbels of angelica.
Celastrina argiolus: Found in moist to semi-dry habitats like dry grasslands, heaths, parks, or gardens. If you have purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) near a pond, currants (Ribes), buckthorn (Rhamnus), broom (Chamaecytisus), lupines (Lupinus), blueberries (Vaccinium), vetches (Vicia), dogwood (Cornus), apple trees (Malus), prunus, knotweeds (Polygonum), oaks (Quercus), strawberry plants (Arbutus), or alder buckthorn (Frangula) in your garden, you might find them there. Various clover species like red clover are also
Celastrina argiolus: Found in moist to semi-dry habitats like dry grasslands, heaths, parks, or gardens. If you have purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) near a pond, currants (Ribes), buckthorn (Rhamnus), broom (Chamaecytisus), lupines (Lupinus), blueberries (Vaccinium), vetches (Vicia), dogwood (Cornus), apple trees (Malus), prunus, knotweeds (Polygonum), oaks (Quercus), strawberry plants (Arbutus), or alder buckthorn (Frangula) in your garden, you might find them there. Various clover species like red clover are also
Papilio machaon: Along with the sail butterfly, it is the largest and most striking diurnal butterfly in the German-speaking region. It likes sunny, open terrain with lean green areas or dry grasslands. If you grow carrots, dill, and fennel, you might even find it in your garden.
Papilio machaon: Along with the sail butterfly, it is the largest and most striking diurnal butterfly in the German-speaking region. It likes sunny, open terrain with lean green areas or dry grasslands. If you grow carrots, dill, and fennel, you might even find it in your garden.
Boloria selene: In Hamburg, it is considered “critically endangered.” Nevertheless, we can find it on various violet species in wet meadows, moorlands, or moist, light areas in forests as well as dry meadows.
Boloria selene: In Hamburg, it is considered “critically endangered.” Nevertheless, we can find it on various violet species in wet meadows, moorlands, or moist, light areas in forests as well as dry meadows.
Zygaena filipendulae: Found in various open habitats in Hamburg – for example, in meadows, moorlands, or dry grasslands. Pay particular attention to plants like common bird’s-foot trefoil, water primrose, or cinquefoil broom.
Zygaena filipendulae: Found in various open habitats in Hamburg – for example, in meadows, moorlands, or dry grasslands. Pay particular attention to plants like common bird’s-foot trefoil, water primrose, or cinquefoil broom.

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